Memorial to the Unknown Soldiers - JBNC - Lemay, MO
Posted by: Groundspeak Premium Member YoSam.
N 38° 29.917 W 090° 16.696
15S E 737353 N 4264650
Quick Description: This is not a tombstone, but a marker to honor those who were moved here from Fort Bellefontaine when the fort was decommissioned and razed.
Location: Missouri, United States
Date Posted: 9/9/2021 4:55:38 AM
Waymark Code: WM14XW3
Published By: Groundspeak Regular Member Geo Ferret
Views: 1

Long Description:

County of obelisk: St. Louis County
Location of Obelisk: Old Post Drive E., in Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery, Lemay
Erected by Daughters of the American Revolution
Date Erected: November 1904
Re-Dedicated by: St. Louis ~ Jefferson Chapter, DAR in 2005

Plaque Text:

MEMORIAL
to
THE UNKNOWN SOLDIERS

Who died while in Camp between 1806 and 1826 at
FORT BELLEONTAINE,
Which Was on the Missouri River Bluffs near St. Louis.
In 1826, This Cantonment was closed and the
Troops Removed to
JEFFERSON BARRACKS.
The Remains of the Officers and Soldiers Were
Reinterred in This National Cemetery by the
U. S. Government April 15, 1904.
-----------
Erected by the St. Louis Chapter of
THE DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION
November 1904


"The Fort Bellefontaine Monument is a red granite boulder that was donated in 1904 by the Daughters of the American Revolution in honor of the officers and soldiers who died at Fort Bellefontaine. Fort Bellefontaine was de-activated as a military post in 1826 and those interred in the post cemetery were re-interred at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. (OPS-1)" ~ JBNC

Web link: [Web Link]

History of Mark:
"Jefferson Barracks, one of the National Cemetery Administrations oldest interment sites, has served as a burial place soldiers from all wars. The original military post was built south of St. Louis, Mo., on the banks of the Mississippi River to replace Fort Bellefontaine. Selected for its strategic geographic location, the post was opened in 1826. Jefferson Barracks became the army’s first permanent base west of the Mississippi River. By the 1840s, it was the largest military establishment in the United States. During the Civil War, Jefferson Barracks served as a training post for the Union Army. There was also a hospital at the post for the Union army’s sick and wounded." ~ Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery


Additional point: Not Listed

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